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Neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia

What is the right way to deal with neurodegenerative diseases?

Dealing with neurodegenerative diseases using dementia as an example. Mobility in neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia, therefore, also often leads to new challenges.

Table of contents:

  • What are neurodegenerative diseases anyway?
  • Dealing with neurodegenerative diseases using dementia as an example.

 

Using the right communication in neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia.

Also, the right way to challenge or encourage, in the case of dementia symptoms.

Neurodegenerative diseases

According to some studies, the neurodegenerative disease factor will be responsible for the most deaths in 2030. This means that it will overtake the current number 1 cancer. However, many people are not aware of this because cancer is the focus of social attention.

Who is affected by neurodegenerative diseases?

Unfortunately, this type of neurodegenerative disease affects almost everyone in old age. This is because, due to age, the number of neuron connections reduces in each of us. In other words, you could imagine it like this. For example, as if there were many balls linked with ropes. We have stored information in each ball.

Dealing with neurodegenerative diseases

However, these balls are not useful on their own. Only when the information from each ball is passed over the ropes do thoughts emerge and we can find solutions.

Neurodegenerative diseases Symptoms

Unfortunately, it takes a lot of energy to maintain these ropes. For this reason, the body cuts these cords in old age. That’s why this process sometimes starts at 35, so the information is all still there. However, the connections dissolve. Therefore, the body can no longer access it. The symptoms of the respective disease depend on the type of nerve affected.

Neurodegenerative diseases Safety in everyday life Mobility solution WHEELLATOR - the limits of safety! Order this exclusive information brochure now!

What do we stand for as a rollator manufacturer at Tukimet OY?

As a rollator manufacturer at Tukimet OY, we stand for every person being able to move safely! More precisely, because movement is one of the most important basic elements for life.

With a focus on the needs of end users, we develop and produce high-quality products that make everyday life easier for people and their relatives. Our products not only create a better quality of life, but they also ensure that people can be more personally independent and take more personal responsibility for every step they take.

Movement – Independence – Safety – Quality of life

  • What does it mean for people to be able to move safely, independently and at the same time increase their quality of life?
  • A safe movement has served for survival for thousands of years! In contrast, a bad movement led to great dangers and even death.
  • In other words, a safe movement means life, to have self-determined control over oneself.
  • Likewise, life means interacting with other people in society.
  • Going to town with them while being an important part in the family and society.
  • Being able to independently manage independence and quality of life, challenges and inconveniences in movement.  This means to be able to live a happy vital life, until old age, enjoying quality of life with friends and family.

We are open to new ideas and reforms and invest in joint university projects. We see through the eyes and hear through the ears of the customer and are always interested in learning about the wishes and needs of impaired people. Our vision is to create new things and fulfill wishes that help people on their way to more mobility and independence.

We invest in the future. With state-of-the-art machinery and our high quality standards, we guarantee safe and durable products that prove themselves in everyday use.

We have high quality standards and are proud of the fact that our walking aids carry the key label “MADE IN FINLAND”. The key label distinguishes us from competitors and shows our customers and consumers that Tukimet Oy not only focuses on quality, durability and sustainability, but also creates and maintains regional jobs.

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Neurodegenerative diseases

According to some studies, the neurodegenerative disease factor will be responsible for the most deaths in 2030. This means that it will overtake the current number 1 cancer. However, many people are not aware of this because cancer is the focus of social attention.

Who is affected by neurodegenerative diseases?

Unfortunately, this type of neurodegenerative disease affects almost everyone in old age. This is because, due to age, the number of neuron connections reduces in each of us. In other words, you could imagine it like this. For example, as if there were many balls linked with ropes. We have stored information in each ball.

Dealing with neurodegenerative diseases.

However, these balls are not useful on their own. Only when the information from each ball is passed over the ropes do thoughts emerge and we can find solutions.

Neurodegenerative diseases Symptoms

Unfortunately, it takes a lot of energy to maintain these ropes. For this reason, the body cuts these cords in old age. That’s why this process sometimes starts at 35, so the information is all still there. However, the connections dissolve. Therefore, the body can no longer access it. The symptoms of the respective disease depend on the type of nerve affected.

Dementia neurodegenerative disease

This is only one form of neurodegenerative disease. In other words, that of dementia. In this blog article, you will learn what exactly neurodegenerative diseases include and how they should be dealt with.

What is dementia?

Dementia is a general term for a reduction in mental abilities. However, it is severe enough to limit daily life.

What causes dementia?

They originate in the brain, where more and more nerve cells are dying off.

What are the different types of dementia?

Primary dementia and secondary dementia are therefore well known.

  • Causes: Primary dementias (such as Alzheimer’s) are independent diseases in which nerve cells in the brain gradually die off. The exact reason for this is unknown.
  • Secondary dementias are, for example, the result of other diseases. For example, alcohol addiction, as well as metabolic disorders and inflammations. As well as the use of medication.
What are neurodegenerative diseases anyway?

“Neurodegenerative disease” is a collective term for a number of diseases. For example, they primarily affect the nerve cells in the human brain

Are neurodegenerative diseases curable?

Neurodegenerative diseases are not curable. They weaken health and lead to progressive degeneration. Accordingly, they also lead to the death of nerve cells. The consequences are problems with movement coordination (ataxias). As well as mental abilities (dementia diseases).

Alzheimer's disease

Dementia, in the form of Alzheimer’s disease, accounts for the largest proportion of neurodegenerative diseases, with 60-70% of cases. “1

Alzheimer’s disease is therefore the most common type of dementia.

The most common neurodegenerative diseases are as follows:

Neurodegenerative diseases list

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Prion diseases (brain tissue is attacked and destroyed by, for example, proteins).
    Motor neuron diseases (“balls” responsible for movement are unknotted or destroyed).
  • This also includes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

 

In addition, rarer diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Huntington’s disease also fall into this group. Huntington’s disease, brain cells of the musculoskeletal system are destroyed by a defective protein.

Even if it is somewhat reprehensible to say so, dementia is probably still the most prominent of these diseases. Accordingly, research is also trying to reduce the fear factor of dementia. This is more or less successful.

Often it is up to the relatives to treat the affected person well and to ensure that the disease takes a mild course.

Dealing with neurodegenerative diseases using the example of dementia

How to challenge a person? Dealing with neurodegenerative diseases. What should be taken from him and what is better left alone? In this section we briefly look at this topic.

Neurodegenerative diseases People with dementia are nevertheless adults.

The person concerned should not be treated like a child. Or, even worse, by being pushed around without comment. Of course, people with dementia still want to talk. Which is therefore completely natural. Better said, it should be tried that the independence and interaction is maintained as long as possible.

Prevention Exercise promotes the course of neurodegenerative diseases

A walk can be a big contribution. However, a carer is often present. The aim should be for the person to walk independently during the walk. Patients with a walking rollator, such as the Wheellator, often notice how much freedom they gain. By being able to walk safely again without the help of another person. Because it is the regaining of freedom for them. Moreover, it gives them a good feeling, despite their illness.

Mobility solution - the limits of safety! Order this exclusive information brochure now!

The world of a person with a neurodegenerative disease like dementia makes sense

Therefore, the following basic attitude is important when dealing with persons with dementia. In their world, their actions and thoughts make sense. Consequently, for those affected, the past is often identical with the present. A great deal of empathy is also necessary. Better said, to put oneself in the situation of the person concerned. This gives us a completely different attitude towards this person. Or rather than simply labelling him or her as “demented”.

Neurodegenerative diseases use the right communication

Dementia patients find it increasingly difficult to exchange information. The cognitive abilities therefore decrease. Furthermore, hearing and vision also decline. Therefore, many people affected in the early stages of a neurodegenerative disease are frustrated. Both anxious or feel increasingly helpless. Because they can observe changes in themselves. Which therefore makes communication even more difficult.

The following tips should help with neurodegenerative diseases.

Use simple and clear language in neurodegenerative diseases.
  • Accordingly, complex sentences and metaphors should be avoided.
  • People with dementia are also unlikely to understand irony and sarcasm.
    In addition, uncomplicated sentences should be used.
  • For example, repeat important information often and always use similar phrases.
  • Clear and slow pronunciation is of course also part of unambiguous language.

Asking the right questions when dealing with neurodegenerative diseases, as exemplified by dementia

Questions are a challenge for dementia patients because they have to access information in their heads. But they may no longer have it. Making clear decisions or explaining something. Therefore, it is usually an overload. As a family member, however, many things can be made easier by asking the right questions.

Yes-no questions.

Accordingly, few alternative questions are helpful in neurodegenerative diseases. If one wants an answer, the choice of questions should leave as few alternatives as possible. Yes/no questions are perfect in this respect. Likewise, questions in which the person affected is presented with a choice between different answers are a good idea.Accordingly, few alternative questions are helpful in neurodegenerative diseases. If one wants an answer, the choice of questions should leave as few alternatives as possible. Yes/no questions are perfect in this respect. Likewise, questions in which the person affected is presented with a choice between different answers are a good idea.

W-questions (i.e. why, what, how, etc.)

However, these are to be avoided because they have too large a horizon of responses. From which the person concerned could choose.

Allow time for a response

Due to the increasing loss of language, finding the right words often takes longer with a neurodegenerative disease. Therefore, patients should simply be given more time to put the right words in a meaningful order. Otherwise, stressful situations could well arise if sufferers feel under pressure. Besides, they will feel good if you show them respect. Therefore, wait for their response.

Correctly challenging or promoting neurodegenerative diseaseset.

Mobility and movement have a positive effect. Both on memory. And also on independence. Therefore, dementia patients should be challenged and encouraged wherever possible. Of course, this should always happen with a certain adaptation to the respective situation of the person with dementia. Overtaxing should also be avoided. When finding challenges, the following questions can be used: “What can the person affected still do well? “What do they particularly enjoy doing? “In which areas does the person still feel competent?

Stressing the body also in dealing with neurodegenerative diseases!

The long walks and the healthy strain on the body are enormously important. Better said when it comes to the dignified ageing of those affected. One study even proved that exercise can surprisingly delay the progression of the disease. If independence and mobility are promoted. For this, we recommend the Wheellator. It is the perfect introduction to getting back on your feet. It therefore gives seniors a sense of security. In addition, it also gives them a feeling of independence. As you are safe while doing so, but do not need another person to walk.

Bring back memories

Often, certain sensations are associated with memories. If one awakens a sense, a person with dementia can regain a memory. One therapeutic approach is therefore to use music. Dancing and music often bring back memories of the past. People with dementia can benefit greatly from this.

Maintaining independence in a neurodegenerative disease, especially in dealing with neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia.

Repetition makes a big difference for people with dementia. Familiar activities can thus remain in the memory longer. Even learning new things is therefore possible to a limited extent. That is why those affected should do everything themselves. Which is accordingly within the realm of possibility. Independence in the case of a neurodegenerative disease should therefore be maintained as far as possible. Help is therefore only necessary if it is absolutely necessary.

This is simply part of ageing with dignity and every adult would probably wish the same.

In conclusion, we should treat our relatives with respect. They are still human beings and can remain an active part of our lives. They can also remain independent with appropriate support. However, what is enormously important for those affected by a neurodegenerative disease is emotional support. It scares them at least as much as it does the relatives, but together this emotional ballast can be lifted.